NGO work in Haiti

Oxfam’s Let Agogo Project in Haiti funds an organisation that gives local people cows, with a focus on women. Support from vets allows them to care for the cows, sell on dairy projects and boosts the local economy.

Calves are given to other families from the original families, so that more can join the scheme. People have used their incomes to buy food, shelter and education. The government also buys some of the milk, which is then treated before being given free to local school children, which then improves their diets. The project has the clear benefit that local people run it for the benefit of other locals.

There are concerns to using cows, however, as just within the USA, POCs of African ancestry have a 75% chance of being lactose intolerant, and the USA is more affluent, and therefore more likely to give people exposure to milk. It is a proven thing that people can maintain a lactose tolerance despite their genetic predisposition if they have enough exposure throughout development, which poor people in Haiti are unlikely to. This being said, the economic benefit is likely to remain as the receivers of the cows can still sell to other ethnic groups with lower incidence of lactose intolerance. It is also worth noting that lactose intolerance normally develops with age somewhat, so that children who will be intolerant can occasionally still benefit from receiving free milk while they are young.

UK Government Funding in Nepal

The UK government has given £65 million to the Nepalese government to use in its health services. This has allowed the government to cut health care fees and allow even the very poorest to access health care. Since 1996, the maternal mortality rate has fallen by 50%, with a 1/3 reduction in infant mortality within 5 years.

The UK provided £20 million in aid over five years for the Safe Motherhood Program, which trains doctors and nurses, improves healthcare facilities, provides equipment, and encourages hospital births, which are generally safer. 90% still give birth at home, but in 2009 alone, 60,000 extra women gave birth in hospitals or other specialised healthcare centres.