Dambisa Moyo- “Dead Aid”

Dambisa Moyo is a Zimbabwean economist, who wrote a book called “dead aid”. She doesn’t argue against the use of short term aid, but she does argue that aid is not getting to the poorest, and that only about 20¢ for every dollar that enters Zimbabwe get’s past Mugabe’s government. She claims that aid doesn’t encourage growth, self sufficiency or efficient enterprise.

Rather than relying on hand outs she says countries need to borrow on markets based on credit ratings. G8 countries have often discussed the state of poorer countries with no representatives for them present, even if they frequently have Western pop stars.

She argues that aid has not really done any overall good as US$1 trillion over 60 years has made no real impact on the incidence of poverty or on economic growth. Moyo claims that aid causes corruption, undermines accountability and chokes trade. This  is a huge fallacy as correlation does not mean causation. Lots of money does travel to relatively corrupt countries, but that’s often because some big disaster has occurred there, such as in Nepal, Ethiopia and many others, because they simply don’t have the money or infrastructure to support everyone even without the corruption, or, like in Swaziland, the presence of corruption is so great that it’s almost the sole cause of poverty.

Moyo suggests that instead of using aid money should be raised within the economy itself, by attracting foreign direct investment, reducing trade restrictions and promoting financial services to the poor. She seems to be unaware of the fact that countries don’t generally gain FDI unless they already have a decent enough economy or infrastructure to attract foreign companies. Far better methods would be to promote stability, tackle issues like climate change which are making it harder for poor countries to develop, reducing world wide corruption, changing immigration policies and promoting peace.

Views like hers may become very dangerous in the near future, as President Trump is likely to take any excuse he can to completely stop aid in the future. She does not propose viable alternatives to aid; the most viable alternatives are all things which Trump would be likely to diminish and suppress, and the US’s current role in aid would be hard to overstate.

Blackwater Estuary and Saltmarsh Degredation

raypits-aerial-web

Coastal squeeze can  be seen at Blackwater Farm where the seawall presses the marshes in, so that the marshes cannot be built up further. This can hinder the development upwards of the marshes too, and make them become the long thin strips seen in the photo above.

A loss of marshland can increase the amplitude of flood events. Marshes absorb salt water as it flows into them, and can thus slow down flooding and reduce the damage it causes.

In turn, more severe flood events can cause greater erosion of the salt marsh, which in turn makes floods more dramatic.

Large quantities of land had to be trapped during the World Wars to allow safe and secure food supplies, especially in WWII, when the German forces started bringing down civilian supply vessels. The walling needed to reclaim that land was what lead to the declining quality of the salt marsh and its declining protections.

In response, holes have been broken through the salt marsh. The remains of the walls should not matter, as water in salt marshes travels in channels like in normal rivers; as long as a route is clear, it should grow fine. The soil was not ideal at best because of the high salt content, so poor quality land is being lost. The land that might develop from the marshes eventually, if they can grow and build up normally will likely be of far higher quality.

(Image Source: http://www.essexbiodiversity.org.uk/coordinators-blog; I don’t know if that’s Blackwater Farm, but it’s definitely a similar area)

Make America Hate Again 2/209

Hello, welcome to Make America Hate Again, the documentary of the hate Trump has made again. The number on the top represents the week of Trump’s term and the number beneath shows how many weeks there are in total of his term. If you want to find a specific week, either change the URL in the top bar^ or search for “part [week number]” into the search bar

For part 0, the last part, the next part and the latest part.

If in doubt, any quotes come from here.

I would also like to clarify: I don’t think all conservatives are idiots. I disagree with many conservative views, but most conservatives’ points can at least be understood. Trump cannot.

I also have to say at this point, I have a real appreciation for all the websites doing a similar day-by-day system. I feel like many of them will only cover the first 100 days though, and I plan on covering the whole thing. The level of detail will of course fall after 100 days though.

January 28th

  • Previously, the travel ban had been said to stop all travel from the 7 black list states. Now, according to the same administration official who made the first announcement, if someone from a black list state moves into another state they can now get a waiver on the rule. I’m not complaining about this change in theory, but in practice this is going to worsen the stream of refugees into European states, where they will stay indefinitely until they can move across. European states will grow even more needlessly embittered about saving people’s lives and stop, sentencing thousands, maybe even millions, of extra people to death.
  • I know we found out about this on the 6th/Feb, but Donald Trump is too inept to find the light switch in the chamber room, so meetings have been held entirely in the dark. Apparently no one had the brains to go find a torch either.

January 29th

  • “It really is a massive success story in terms of implementation on every single level” claims an Unnamed white house official , about the travel ban. I am unsure if he’s just been censored from learning about the protests. He spoke only on the condition of anonymity, which either means he was being sarcastic and was worried about being fired, or knows he’s talking nonsense and didn’t want anyone trying to get him to justify it.
  • The state visit of Trump to the UK was announced to be going ahead, despite calls from MPs for him to not be allowed into Parliament, general disapproval of his visit, and a well-backed petition with 1.25 million signatures on Change.org (where normally 100,000 are needed) for him to not be allowed in as a form of retaliation against him not letting refugees in (and against many other things, too).
  • The US embassy of the UK insisted that they would not be allowing VISAs into the US from the seven banned states (I think I’ll refer to them as the 7BS from now on, which serves both to represent the name and what most people think of it), even to people with US citizenship or dual nationality.
  • Yemen’s minister of foreign affairs spoke out against the travel ban from the 7BS, saying it was going to feed into conflict and extremism within Yemen. Yemen has had a civil war raging for years now, so anything that could increase their conflict is hard to imagine, and really should not be encouraged.
  • Indonesia said the ban would not help against the fight against terror
  • Asian financial markets were still plummeting due to uncertainties caused by the ban.

January 30th

  • Steve Miller, a Trumpian advisor claimed on the morning show that the protests about the refugee bans are a good thing: “If nobody’s disagreeing with what you’re doing, um, then you’re probably not doing anything that really matters.” It honestly sounded like he was asking a question. This means one (or both) of two things. 1) They don’t seem to realise that that proverb really only counts for if you’re not the one in charge; if you persuaded people to let you be in charge, then you shouldn’t have anyone disagreeing with you on things that really matter; 2) Even Trump’s advisors can’t think up good reasons for the things he’s doing.
  • Steve Bannon, the man I said the following about: “I’ve known Steve Bannon a long time. If I thought he was a racist, or alt-right, or any of the things that we can, you know, the terms we can use, I wouldn’t even think about hiring him.” You saying you were concerned about him being racist or alt-right basically confirms he is, especially with you again admitting it by wavering around the point for three separate clauses.”  before, is now on the Security Council. This is a big deal. He essentially has the power to force any country to do what he wants, by right of the veto power of the USA. He has the right to force any country to act in racist ways, and there is nothing anyone can do about it, currently, legally. Bush didn’t even do this. The White House justified this by saying he was “in the Navy“.  This is made even worse because Bannon described Trump’s voters as the “working-class hobbits.” He can’t even respect his own citizens and he’s now technically one of the most powerful people on the planet, arguably more powerful than Trump himself. This is a Bad Thing.
  • Steve Bannon told the media to “Keep its mouth shut.” First step of a dictatorship (at least, of the brutal ones which manage to be iconically disgusting) is government officials not allowing journalists to say what they want.
  • People trying to enter the US, even US citizens, from the 7 black list states, now need to be handcuffed, and be patted down, including groping of the chest area (which if anyone can store anything dangerous in, I would be very impressed), as described by this woman.
  • Justice Secretary, Sally Yates, from the Obama Administration, ordered the department not to follow Trump’s Executive Order to ban Middle Eastern entry from the US. She was staying until there was a confirmed replacement for her role. They were initially expected to defend the policy, although lawyers tasked with defending it seemed baffled and perplexed about how- how to make it seem legal and how to justify it. The department then said they would not defend the policy as long as Yates was their attorney general. Jeff Sessions is expected to reverse this.

January 31st

  • Acting Attorney General was Sally Yates was fired, at 1:00 in the morning GMT, or 8:00 PM East Coast Time, on the 30th. Sessions was expected to be put into the role anyway today, pushing her out of the acting position. She was not allowed to even do her job as head of Justice; defining whether certain actions are legal and whether people are guilty or not.
  • Neil Gorsuch is now in the supreme court for life.
  • Trump delayed signing an order centred on improving cyber security.
  • Trump has not  repealed Obama’s act stopping discrimination against LGBT+ workers working with federal agencies or contractors. He has said that they have to be “at the direction of” Trump though, which, to me, sounds a lot like “you can still discriminate when I tell you you can.”
  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director was named as Thomas Honan.

February 1st

  • Many republican members of the senate have announced that they will not be supporting Trump’s decision to make Betsy Devos head of the Department of Education.
  • Trump urges a move that a simple majority can push through a candidate for office. I don’t think this will allow Betzy Devos through anyway, most republicans have to have brain cells to get where they are (the main exceptions being the people Trump picks, and himself).
  • Committees approve Jeff Sessions, the man too racist to be a judge to become attorney general, and Rex Tillerson for secretary of state, despite his ties to Russia. But, I guess, if Trump got in, we shouldn’t expect that to be an issue.
  • Evangelical christian leader Jerry Falwell Jr  is now in charge of an education reform task force, and he intends to remove protections against sexual assault from University and College campuses. I never understood this mentality in fundamentalist Christians, the thinking that abortion is absolutely wrong, but contraception is too, and they don’t even think about protecting women from rapists. Surely if you don’t want unwanted babies to be aborted you should actively encourage contraception? The unwanted babies have to be stopped somewhere (unless people really like parents not valuing their children) and it makes a lot more sense to me to focus on before anyone can start trying to argue they’re alive yet.
  • The USA puts Iran “on notice” for testing missiles. What “on notice” means is a mystery.
  • A counter-terrorism task force was renamed to be specifically targetting radical islam. The vast majority of American terrorists are not Muslim. This is new heights of stupid. Or it would be, if this weren’t Trump.
  • Trump pays his respects to the Navy Seal who died because he couldn’t be bothered to read the mission briefing properly.
  • Trump claims that most reporters who cover him are a disgrace
  • “Iran is rapidly taking over more and more of Iraq even after the U.S. has squandered three trillion dollars there. Obvious long ago!” Trump doesn’t seem to realise this was never a thing. There was an Iraqi invasion of Iran in the 1980’s, but never an Iranian invasion of Iraq, as far as I can work out.
  • Trump annulls the deal Obama made with Australia to essentially swap refugees.
  • It’s hard to miss the irony of him being “proud to honor the start of black history month… with @VP Mike Pence,” given how racist they both are.

February 2nd

  • The white house said that Trump was “very upset” about the refugee deal with Australia, but that he would honour it, which sounds like how most parents would describe a child’s temper tantrum after it had ended, really.
  • Trump’s treasury department adjusted their sanctions against Russia’s intelligence services in light of their activities during the election period.
  • Trump says he wants to either renegotiate or replace the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement. He’s going to do a lot of replacing perfectly good things with a slightly worse copy of them in the next four years, isn’t he?

February 3rd

  • Donald Trump has both managed to completely disregard the importance of the decisions he has to make and made many of his staff completely opposed to him. If his staff had any  respect for him, they would not be leaking details, as opposed to officially releasing  them. An interviewee also explains how others also feel they need to do this to get him to pay attention to him. Far more important than this are the horrendously misinformed decisions he is making. The video linked here is a good summary by MSNBC of some of the awful decisions he has made. Around 8:30 they summarise how misinformed he is around a single one of his decisions.
  • 227,000 new jobs were generated over January. Whether this was before Trump came to power or not, I don’t know. I also don’t know how many of these were because of having to enforce stupid new rules. Can you imagine how much more work security guards and lawyers got from the travel ban?
  • Trump called for reviews of the banking regulations put in after the 2008 recession.
  • Tens of thousands of VISAs have been revoked under the travel ban
  • US immigration officials have postponed meeting refugees in Australia, suggesting that the White House is pushing against the resettlement program fairly forcefully now.
  • Republicans in Congress have called to repeal various acts to regulate emissions and environmental damage from business. This is oddly similar to how, in a documentary called Death by China by the US trade secretary, there’s one interviewee who says [paraphrasing] “China got rich by polluting all their waste in their rivers. Can you imagine how much richer we could be if we removed our regulations and dumped all our waste in the Ohio river?” He specifically mentioned the Ohio river, and it genuinely sounded like he wanted to dump waste in it. They are dangerously close to that man’s opinions.

Improving Slums

We had a debate in our geography class last year about which issues were most important to resolve when upgrading slums. We were each assigned a particular aspect of the worst-case situation to argue as a priority to resolve, and asked to come up with some means to solve it. That’s why this might come off as very poorly structured (even by my standards). I’m also mentioning that explanation as I’m not sure where my notes on healthcare measures went, and this is likely to be updated once I’ve found (or remade) them.

Physical Infrastructure

  • 84% of houses have no water supply. Illegal water sellers are expensive, and many people take water from rivers.
  • Roads are impermeable (leading to issues with erosion, flooding downstream and others)
  • Illegal electricity (in many slums) can lead to electrical fires
  • 90% of people in slums (worldwide) die of disease
  • Water can be purified using plastic bottles
  • Kenya has projects for community based solar power to help improve the local electrical supply
  • The Green Exchange program (where waste is exchanged for cash or food parcels. The waste is used for various purposes depending on location. In Curitiba, Brazil, it is reused for other purposes. The exact waste can vary with location, too. It helps prevent malnutrition and any issues that could arise from a dirty environment.)

Social Infrastructure (mostly referring to Rio de Janeiro)

  • 880 million people live in slums globally.
  • Complexo de Alemão is trying to reduce crime rates by building 2 primary schools, 2 creches, a technical college and a library
  • Complexo has 70,000 people with insufficient education and healthcare
  • A cable car was built to transport people from the slums to Rio’ center. This has helped unemployment rates. The stations are cheap, and have lead to greater educational, job, and healthcare options.
  • Cidade de Deus healthcare clinic was set up in the slums
  • Olympic values were taught to children; 168 schools, 100,000 children
  • Favela painting is a practice to occupy people’s time productively. The favelas are made to look better by occupying local people to paint buildings in bright colours and patterns. The normal buildings are often bare brick and mud. Very drab environments are bad for people’s emotional health, so painting the favelas in bright shades is improving people’s wellbeing.
  • There has been an 80% drop from 30,000 gun crimes per year once gangs were removed.

Housing

  • 40% live in shanty towns
  • People used to just be used to worse areas
  • Now people are provided with material
  • There are housing projects to remove the shanty areas and replace them with proper housing
  • 1/3 of people in poor cities live in self-built houses
  • The Bairro project, in Rociña, Rio de Janeiro, aims to increase the average size of slum homes to 20m^2 and to widen the main streets.
  • Barra de Tijica, Brazil, is a new town located through a mountain from Rio, providing new housing in 10-30 storey blocks, and is now home to 180,000 people.
  • Almost all the houses in Rociña are made out of concrete and brick, contributing to 100s of businesses
  • NGOs are working to improve the situation
  • Oxfam are working to improve the lives of 100 million people living in slums worldwide
  • Some slums still have no provision of basic services.

Employment

  • Oxfam provides water tanks for affordable use in many slums
  • Most people use informal water supplies
  • in Hima, Peru, there was a census including types of businesses, which lead to improvements in encouraging foreign businesses to buy goods from slum workers.
  • Does this actually provide them with enough money to escape poverty?
  • People in slums can enter themselves in the yellow pages, which has been quite successful in Brazil and Peru.
  • However, businesses in slums are unregulated by the police, and are unprotected by the police, in many areas

Waste

  • 4.3 million cases of cholera worldwide
  • Most people produce about 300g of waste a day
  • 2.4 million people in Nairobi are living in slums
  • Composite farms gather waste in biodegradable bags, which, after 6-8 weeks, can be used as manure, leading to better soil fertility, better farming, and more food and income
  • Bioplants can be made in Kibera. Many people use the same latrine. The methane produced from this can be harvested and then resold as cooking gas, which helps kill off germs in water and food
  • Umende has 57 bio centers, and has collected 60,000 kg of waste
  • Nepal has 2.8 million people living in slums. In Kathmandu. 10,000 of the 31,000 slum dwellers are waste collectors. The informal sector work is often exploited.
  • There is an Umbrella Group which workers can register with t monitor them and give vocational training
  • The Green Exchange program in Nepal has led to 4,000 waste worker jobs, with 50% of the beneficiaries being women.

Gender Issues in Malawi

Chief Kachindamoto, the Inkosi in Dezda district, is annulling child marriages within her area, and sending girls back to school within Malawi.

Young girls, 12+ are getting married and having children traditionally in Malawi. Early pregnancies can be fatal, as the woman’s body has not grown fully. Her reproductive organs and pelvis have not either, which can lead to major internal damage, with her uterus bursting at the extreme.

In 2013, Kachindamoto said there would be no more child marriages in her area. She has the authority to enforce rules if there are protests about them, and she can fire any hired figures who help child marriages occur.

The average woman in Malawi earns US$11 a month. There are still dowries to pay for a woman’s marriage. Girls cannot afford basic items, such as soap, and many people laugh at young mothers. Girls will often go ahead with child marriage so they can access these basic items, despite the stigma, believing that their quality of life will improve.

The recommended class size in Malawi is 60 people per class, with some classes having up to 160 pupils. This is, of course, an issue for everyone, but it is often girls who will lose out on education first if there is little opportunity for good learning in less developed countries.

Gender violence in marriage is very common, alongside domestic abuse. Many girls complain that their new husbands will frequently go out with other women, and not provide for them or the other women.

Kachindamoto’s movement includes building  new lodgings  for girls which they can live in until their education is complete, without their ex-husbands’ presence.

Child marriage is illegal in Malawi before the age of 18. The girls in Malawi say there is a difference between having a law and enforcing that law, between passing and enforcing it. This is largely because the constitution and the law do not agree with each other; the constitution does not ban marriages at any age, and only says to “discourage” marriages before age 15.

Japan vs UK equality

Of the top 25 richest nations on Earth, Japan is the most equal. The top 5% of earners take 4.5 times the income of the lowest earners in Japan; in contract, the top 10% in the UK earn 20 times the income of the poorest 10%. There are more people earning more than £1,000,000 in the Barclays Tower in Canary Wharf than in the whole of Japan.

Japan achieved their equality after the dropping of the atomic bombs during WWII. After the War, the USofA started rebuilding the state, took all of the land, and divided it equally between the Japanese people.

The average life expectancy is 83 years in Japan.

The United Kingdom is more divided by economics than countries like Israel are by ethnic conflict. London is the most expensive city in the world to live in. There are no significant equality changes under political party changes. Apart from in NYC, no other city pays financiers like in London; and the UK pays bankers, proportionally to the Gross National Product, earn far more. On current projections, the UK is set to become the most unequal society in the world.

In the UK, the average clothing item is worn 5 times before being thrown away; it’s worth noting that this is probably highly skewed by the richest in society who can afford to wear something just once. 2% of the GDP is made up of advertising, while 1% of the rest of Europe’s GDP was.

 

 

Oman Water Supplies

The Domestic water supply is one of Oman’s most pressing environmental issues.

Causes

  • Oman has a limited supply of rainfall each year

Mean rainfall in coastal areas can be as low as 40mm annually. In mountain areas, this can reach up to 350mm. The total average annual rainfall is 62mm.

  • Enough of a water supply has to be maintained for agriculture and domestic use. 94% of Oman’s water is used in agriculture, and 2% in industry.
  • Rapid population growth in the North of Oman

Impacts

  • Overuse of water resources has lead to the soil near coastal regions becoming increasingly saturated with salt water, and increasingly saline.

Responses

Unconventional water sources make up 13% of the water supply of Oman, which means desalination techniques from salt water and reuse of waste water. Much of the waste water is used in irrigation and agriculture.

  • Water is collected from fossil water sources; largely underwater springs in the desert.

At the moment, desert springs are largely used as an extra reserve supply in times of peak demand. Oman is making huge efforts to reduce its dependency on this supply of water.

The aquifers were originally produced during a period of time where Oman had a far wetter climate, and it is unlikely that they can naturally replenish in a warming planet, where less rain will fall in Oman.

  • Piped water is available throughout the country.
  • Effluent water is reused, once purified, to be used on crops.

In 2006, 37 million m^3 of water was reused from waste water.

  • Dams have been built to store water

Since 1985, 31 dams have been built throughout Oman to control water flow and retain some of the peak discharge which would otherwise be lost and cause damage downstream. In 2006, maximum capacity was 88.4 million m^3 of water.

  • The government in Oman has realised the detrimental effects of over using ground water; Oman has now started using a desalination technique on sea water, which has become Oman’s main source of drinking water

The Public Authority for Electricity and Water takes salt water from four separate sites, in Ghubra, Barka, Sohar, and Sur. Barka, Ghubra and Sohar all supply the more densely populated North on the Main Integrated System while Sur supplies the Ash Sharqiyah region (I couldn’t find Ghubra on a map; searching for it brings up a district within the capital, Muscat, a few blocks from the sea, o there is a reasonable chance that is correct. If it is, then Ghubra is still labelled within Muscat).

oman-water-sources-in-the-north

The Ghubra plant was built first. Barka has three smaller plants within it; two are reverse osmosis systems while the other is a thermal desalination plant.

To cope with the growing population, Oman is investing in two further water purification plants in Qurayyat and at the border between two districts; north and south Al Batinah. Work is also underway on pipelines to transport surface water to Muscat.

In 2006, the desalination plants were able to desalinate 109 million m^3 of water each year.

 

UK Government Funding in Nepal

The UK government has given £65 million to the Nepalese government to use in its health services. This has allowed the government to cut health care fees and allow even the very poorest to access health care. Since 1996, the maternal mortality rate has fallen by 50%, with a 1/3 reduction in infant mortality within 5 years.

The UK provided £20 million in aid over five years for the Safe Motherhood Program, which trains doctors and nurses, improves healthcare facilities, provides equipment, and encourages hospital births, which are generally safer. 90% still give birth at home, but in 2009 alone, 60,000 extra women gave birth in hospitals or other specialised healthcare centres.

Maya Lands and Oil Dispute

In Belize, people who buy land only buy the surface (and the right to dig down to build surface-based projects, such as house foundations and planting fence posts).

This is because, in Belize, due to the predominant rock type being limestone, there are many branching cave networks carved out by underground rivers throughout the country. The blue hole, a popular diving site, was formed by one of these cave networks collapsing, and the sea water pouring in to fill the space left behind. On the main land, many of these caves were used by the Maya people before the European colonisation of Meso-America. The Maya believed that there were steps up to heaven and down to hell, and that the cave networks were linked into these steps. Thus, caves were very spiritually important to the Maya people. Many burial sites were made within the cave networks. They were also used for sacred rituals, including human sacrifices, on occasion.

When North American buyers came in to buy land, the government was concerned that, should they find a Maya cave, they would use it as a tourist attraction, disrespecting the original culture, possibly damaging it, and the money produced from this would be leaked out and not even help the local economy to thrive. To stop this happening, the Belizean government decided that land rights were only applicable to the surface of the land, and that should a greater depth be needed for something, the government had to be consulted.

The Maya in the South of the country, in Toledo district, claim right to the lands in their district, which was, largely, respected. However, the government decided to allow oil companies from outside to look for oil resources in the south of the country.

This has raised issues with Maya people, not just because of the lack of farmland. Maya generally practice a subsistence lifestyle, so that they only produce so much food as they need to survive, and they farm in the forest using slash-and-burn methods. Their practice has worked for hundreds, if not thousands, of years in the forests without any noticeable negative impacts to the overall environment. However, this is threatened by oil companies. Oil wells can often leave exposed, or more exposed, oil at the surface of the land. Oil, for obvious reasons, does not mix well with slash-and-burn farming. Oil wells mean large sections of Maya land cannot be used, threatening their livelihoods.

Other concerns are that the Maya will gain little financial benefit, as very few of them will actually be employed by the oil companies. The few who are employed are likely to only be so for the short term, and to have low wages while they are. Some say that no Belizean should be happy with the current format for exploiting oil, with the company taking 95% of the total profit, and nationals only gaining 5%. It could also impact organic cocoa farming, which is a substantial portion of the Belizean economy.

This is what lead to a campaign by the Toledo Alcade’s Association and the Maya Leader’s Alliance to declare the Mayan people’s stance on oil exploitation in 2012. One MLA spokesperson said that they could not begin to discuss oil exploration without a proper acknowledgement of the Maya land rights, as, in law, their “free, prior and informed consent” is needed, as they are the owners of the land that US oil companies intend to extract from.

Make America Hate Again- 1/209

Hello, welcome to Make America Hate Again, the documentary of the hate Trump has made again. The number on the top represents the week of Trump’s term and the number beneath shows how many weeks there are in total of his term. If you want to find a specific week, either change the URL in the top bar^ or search for “part [week number]” into the search bar

For part 0, the next part, and the latest part.

If in doubt, any quotes come from here.

I would also like to clarify: I don’t think all conservatives are idiots. I disagree with many conservative views, but most conservatives’ points can at least be understood. Trump cannot.

General summary:

(source)

  • Appoint judges “who will uphold the Constitution” and “defend the Second Amendment” (the right to bear arms)
  • Construct a wall on the southern U.S. border and limit immigration “to give unemployed Americans an opportunity to fill good-paying jobs”
  • Re-assess trade agreements with other nations and “crack down” on companies that send jobs overseas
  • Repeal and replace the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare)
  • Remove federal restrictions on energy production
  • Push for an amendment to the United States Constitution imposing term limits on Congress[5][6]
  • Eliminate gun-free zones[7]
  • Formulate a rule on regulations “that for every one new regulation, two old regulations must be eliminated”[8]
  • Instruct the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to “develop a comprehensive plan to protect America’s vital infrastructure from cyberattacks, and all other form of attacks.”[8]
  • Label China a “currency manipulator”

January 20th

  • “…against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the earth.” There’s only two ways to remove an ideology. The first, is the Nazi-esque route of killing everyone who has it, and killing everyone who looks like they might have it, and to kill all their relatives so the genes that allow that to be passed on are not passed on. This is not recommended. The second is to not try to eradicate it. When you meet someone from one of those fragile groups, you go out of your way to show them they’re a valuable person. People who believe they’re valuable don’t become suicide bombers. You show them they can function perfectly well in your society. People who fit within a society don’t abandon it to deliberately try bringing it down. One of these methods is far cheaper, and easier, literally anyone can contribute to it, and most importantly of all- it doesn’t need genocide.
  • “I heard when people of sound mind come out of those meetings [briefings about their role as president], they’re either crying, or thrown away by it. The amazing power to destroy this planet that’s in a finger of the president of the United States, the second he takes office is too awesome for a normal human being to imagine.” says Chris Matthews, a member of the Carter administration, as a speechwriter. He said this after describing how the relayed message for the nuclear launch is sent. It sounded a lot like he was about to add “and this is how I know he isn’t of sound mind.” He then referencedan interview: “I asked” What, what should happen to a woman that chooses to have an abortion? Either you’re-” “Well,” he said, “There has to be some punishment for her.” And then he said- he also said- … we… he “wouldn’t rule out nuclear weapons in Europe.” Europe’s small! If you blow up somebody, everybody get’s blown up! And he said “Why did we make ’em if we’re not going to use ’em?”” I think the nuclear comment speaks for itself (in an intense level of moronic), but I can’t comprehend how the idea that a woman should be punished even in situations where she’s aborting to save her life, or when the baby would never survive, or when she was raped, manages to keep entering politics.
  • Chris Matthews also says that Donald Trump sent a christmas card back to him, autographed. “This is a beautiful family, Donald Trump.” Which completely puts him out of touch with the entire population; greetings cards being sent back is a huge insult in the UK, and I assume it is in the US.
  • The secretary of Education, Betsy Devos, wants there to be fire arms in schools to help fight off bears. It’s oddly ironic how stupid that justification is. I’m sure the first stop most bears take when approaching towns (which they do very often) is to directly approach schools, enter them, and start attacking pupils, because obviously, the 30% of the diet that is meat in grizzly bears is best satisfied by yelling, screaming kids who would definitely not scare a bear off just by sheer number of them, and the noise volume. Besides, most animals judge size by the front face, and bear shoulders honestly reach roughly up to many people’s stomachs and no further. She also militantly calls for school privitisation; her entire job will probably be cutting education money and campaigning for private schools. Poor children won’t even be able to afford schooling in Trump’s USA. As I said before, I would not be willing to keep my children in public schooling if I were a parent in the USA at the moment, and this further confirms that.
  • Riots started on Friday in response to the inaugoration.

January 21st

  • “I looked out, the field was, looked like million, million and a half people. They showed a field where there was practically nobody standing there. And they said, “Donald Trump did not draw well.”” Apparently we’re dealing with someone who doesn’t realise that a field which looks about 5% full isn’t a good turn out.
  • Half a million women worldwide stage protest marches against Trump, completely overshadowing his first day as president, in the largest protest in the USA since the Vietnam war. Good work.

January 22nd

January 23rd

  • The White House outright refused to release Trump’s tax returns.
  • The USA has officially backed out of the TPP.
  • Trump again claimed that there were millions of illegal votes against him, making this the official government position.
  • The official replacement for Obamacare has been proposed. States that like Obamacare can keep it, but all others have to adopt whatever else Trump comes up with. I think very few states will opt out of Obamacare.
  • Donald Trump claims that his inauguration day should be an annual day of celebration- the National Day of Patriotic Declaration. This should be concerning to everyone. He didn’t say that inauguration day should be- just his inauguration day. Which rather suggests it’s the last inauguration he thinks they’ll be. It also mirrors comments from the DPRK very closely. It is now official US legislation. It seems to be a tradition for US presidents to rename inauguration day something else for their term, but Patriotic Declaration comes far from Bush’s Prayer and Thanksgiving or Obama’s Renewal and Reconciliation.
  • Sean Spicer said “We can disagree on facts”.

January 24th

  • Four journalists reporting about the protests were arrested. If charged, and all other people arrested already for this in Trump’s term are charged too, then 6 people are facing 10 years in jail and a US$25,000 fine. None of their reports actually featured any valid legal charges, while real crimes were occurring in the rioting on Friday and being entirely ignored. I think this would make them classifiable as political prisoners.

January 25th

  • “”They would all be for the other side,” he said, possibly forgetting that one of the few arrests for voting fraud in 2016 was of an Iowa woman who tried to vote for him twice.” I think we all know about Trump’s constant allegations that millions of people voted “illegally” for Clinton. I’ve also stated before that I suspect he means PoCs, women or Muslims. Here is to highlight his complete disgregard for actual facts. If he cared about facts, he would have checked this out and found this case which he completely opposes with his “informed” conclusion. “”Look forward to seeing final results of VoteStand, Gregg Phillips and crew say at least 3,000,000 votes were illegal. We must do better!”” This sounds like he’s trying to make higher claims of illegal votes just to boost his reputation. He then calls for harsher voting restrictions and checks, which would not have much of an effect nationally, and then for the removal of early voting procedures, which would hinder voting groups who mostly favour democrat (the poor, PoCs, disabled individuals), who cannot physically reach a polling station on voting day, either because their bodies are not able to or because they cannot take time off work. I would say that if only 3 people were found to have commited fraud of 314 million, the rules are already harsh enough. 1 in 100 million is not exactly much.

January 26th

  • President Enrique Peña Nieto and Donald Trump “jointly” cancelled their meeting due to “disagreements on who should build the Mexico-USA border wall”. Trump said that Mexico is not treating the USA “fairly”.

January 27th

  • Banning all immigration and visitors from Somalia, Libya, Sudan, Syria, Iran, Iraq and Yemen, all Muslim majority, while allowing any and all Christian migrants, which is against the US constitution’s statement (in the First Ammendment) on not being a Christian country (or rather, guaranteeing a complete right to religious freedom), but instead being intentionally secular. “If the ban were announced with a one week notice, the “bad” would rush into our country during that week. A lot of bad “dudes” out there!” It takes a lot longer than a week to prepare your documents and walk or smuggle yourself to an airport in a war torn country. One family took 2 years preparing their documents and travel, and arrived in Philadelphia just after receiving their visas, making touch down within moments of the announcement. They were arrested and deported back to Iraq, having spent less than a day in the country they had come to to escape war. This is one example of many I have found very, very easily.
  • These people are not allowed to enter the USA for 90 days, with refugee admissions suspended for 120 days with “case by case” exceptions, with Syrian refugees suspended indefinitely. Only 50,000 refugees are allowed to enter the USA in 2017. He says this will “Keep radical Islamic terrorists out of the US“, even though the 7 banned states are not the states the 19 9/11 bombers were from, which were Saudi Arabia (15), the UAE (2), Lebanon (1) and Egypt (1). Note that none of these were the states that got travel bans (and it would be pretty awful if that were why they did, as 1 person is definitely not representative of any population, and I highly doubt 15 would be, even in somewhere far less populous than Saudi Arabia.